XANTHAN GUM – Usage, Efficacy, Side Effects and Drug Interactions

Xanthan Gum Featured in “The GNC Gourmet: The Fun of Multipurpose Ingredients
The 4 Hour Chef – “The Scientist”

 

Consumer Information and Education
Provided by
4hourlife.com
Based on
Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database
puhdr logo XANTHAN GUM   Usage, Efficacy, Side Effects and Drug Interactions

XANTHAN GUM

What is it?
Xanthan gum is a sugar-like compound made by mixing aged (fermented) sugars with a certain kind of bacteria. It is used to make medicine.Xanthan gum is used for lowering blood sugar and total cholesterol in people with diabetes. It is also used as a laxative.Xanthan gum is sometimes used as a saliva substitute in people with dry mouth (Sjogren’s syndrome).In manufacturing, xanthan gum is used as a thickening and stabilizing agent in foods, toothpastes, and medicines. Xanthan gum is also an ingredient in some sustained-release pills.
Is it Effective?
Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.The effectiveness ratings for XANTHAN GUM are as follows:

Possibly Effective for…

  • Use as a bulk-forming laxative to treat constipation.
  • Lowering blood sugar in people with diabetes.
  • Lowering cholesterol levels in people with diabetes.
  • Use as a saliva substitute for dry mouth.
How does it work?
Xanthan gum swells in the intestine, which stimulates the digestive tract to push stool through. It also might slow the absorption of sugar from the digestive tract and work like saliva to lubricate and wet the mouth in people who don’t produce enough saliva.
Are there safety concerns?
Xanthan gum is safe when up to 15 grams per day are taken. It can cause some side effects such as intestinal gas (flatulence) and bloating.People who are exposed to xanthan gum powder might experience flu-like symptoms, nose and throat irritation, and lung problems.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of xanthan gum during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid using amounts larger than those normally found in foods.

Nausea, vomiting, appendicitis, hard stools that are difficult to expel (fecal impaction), narrowing or blockage of the intestine, or undiagnosed stomach pain: Do not use xanthan gum if you have any of these conditions. It is a bulk-forming laxative that could be harmful in these situations.

Surgery: Xanthan gum might lower blood sugar levels. There is a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using xanthan gum at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Are there any interactions with medications?

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Interaction Rating = Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Xanthan gum might decrease blood sugar by decreasing the absorption of sugars from food. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking xanthan gum with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Are there any interactions with Herbs and Supplements?

Herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar levels

Xanthan gum might lower blood sugar. Using it with other natural products that may also lower blood sugar might cause blood sugar to drop too low. Some herbs and supplements with hypoglycemic potential include devil’s claw, fenugreek, guar gum, Panax ginseng, and Siberian ginseng.

Are there interactions with Foods?
There are no known interactions with foods.
What dose is used?
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:BY MOUTH:The World Health Organization (WHO) has set the maximum acceptable intake for xanthan gum as a food additive at 10 mg/kg per day and as a laxative at 15 grams per day. For safety and effectiveness, bulk laxatives such as xanthan gum require extra fluids.

  • For diabetes: a typical dose is 12 grams per day as an ingredient in muffins.
What other names is the product known by?
Bacterial Polysaccharide, Corn Sugar Gum, Goma Xantana, Gomme de Sucre de Maïs, Gomme de Xanthane, Gomme Xanthane, Polysaccharide Bactérien, Polysaccharide de Type Xanthane, Polysaccharide Xanthane, Xanthan, Xanthomonas campestris.

Resources:

Xanthan Gum

 XANTHAN GUM   Usage, Efficacy, Side Effects and Drug Interactions

 

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